What Keeps You Motivated?

 

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Summary

What motivates you?

What’s the one thing that keeps you motivated so you don’t burn out?

It’s your DREAM.

Because when you have a big dream and obsess about getting it, you won’t let anything or anyone stop you from achieving it.

It’s not about what you do… it’s WHY you do it. That’s what’s going to keep you from burning out.

Billionaires and the greatest achievers in the world almost never burn out. Because their dreams are so big, and they’re committed to doing anything and everything to get it.

Build. Don’t burn out.

Full Transcript

Speaker 1:

So, one of the questions that I deal with a lot and that you’ll run into is how do I stay motivated? Who’s had this issue? You were talking about it. When I get back, you said-

Speaker 2:

No [inaudible 00:00:27].

Speaker 1:

Who is saying [inaudible 00:00:28]. I was just going to state it’s going to be hard to stay motivated. Somebody said that. Wasn’t that you? Yeah, said, “I know it’s going to be hard for me to stay motivated. I got to really work hard to stay motivated.” So, here’s a quote, here’s a question. What keeps you motivated?

Speaker 2:

Your dream.

Speaker 1:

The dream. That’s it. Period.

I’m going to teach you guys a secret. I’ve never heard this from anybody else. I just don’t know. God showed it to me or something, but I figured this out. Because people burn out. How many of you have seen somebody burn out? How many of you have ever personally felt true burnout? Okay. Wow. All of you.

So, that bothered me. And I train real estate agents, and I see some super high achievers, and then they always burn out. And I’m like, fuck, that’s losing. That’s not winning. Build and then you burn it down. Build and then you burn it down.

Now you could burn it down by bad actions, like I did. Or you could burn it down by just you burning out, and it just all collapses. And I’m like that’s not winning. How do you win in life if you have big dreams, and then you’re pursuing those dreams and then you burn out? And so I’m a coach, and I’m trying to figure this out. I’m figuring out my own life, and I’m like when I started this journey with building YesMasters, I never burned out. I’ve never felt burnout. I’ve never come close to burnout. Now there are many days where I’m like, “I don’t want to do this.” Like resistance days where I’m tired and all that, but never a day when I’m just like, “I don’t enjoy what I do anymore. I don’t enjoy it.” Now there are things I don’t enjoy about what I do, and I’m like, “What drives me and I don’t burn out?” And then I realize is not even what I do. It’s why I do it. And then I started studying.

So in 2019, but the year before Covid, I made a commitment that year I was going to study billionaires and the highest achievers in the world. And I was like billionaires are people who almost never burn out. How does Steve Jobs, how did he never burn out? How does Warren Buffet never burn out? Bill Gates, how did he never burn out? Oprah Winfrey, how does she never burn out? What did they do that kept them from ever burning out? And Elon Musk. He spent his 40th birthday sleeping on the floor in his office, because he worked 20 something hours that day. You guys remember the story? He works all the time. The guy works 80, 90 hours a week. How does he not burn out?

Speaker 3:

He’s got the dream.

Speaker 1:

Because his dreams are too big.

Speaker 3:

Mars.

Speaker 1:

Did you say something different? What’d you say?

Speaker 4:

I said he’s on Ozempic. That’s a weight loss drug.

Speaker 1:

Okay. Because I could tell you humored yourself.

Speaker 4:

Yeah. Because [inaudible 00:03:40].

Speaker 1:

And I’m like I missed the humor. But here’s why. Because his dreams are too big. Because he dreams. And then I saw something that Ted Turner said. So, Ted Turner… You guys know who Ted Turner was?

Speaker 4:

No.

Speaker 1:

Ted Turner was a billionaire. He was the founder of TNT.

Speaker 3:

Turner Classic Channel?

Speaker 4:

TBS?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, Turner Network. He was the founder of CNN.

Speaker 3:

Oh, okay.

Speaker 1:

Turner Broadcasting was way back in the 1900s, like the 80s or 90s. I don’t know when he started. His name was Ted Turner. And he became a billionaire. And he was being interviewed one time, and I read this somewhere. I didn’t hear it. I just read it somewhere. And they were asking him about how did you get so rich? It’s like he was Warren Buffet. And he said, “My dad taught me something.” His dad was not rich, but he said, “My dad taught me something, that this is the number one secret to why I’ve been so successful.” He said, “My dad taught me have dreams so big that cannot be accomplished in your lifetime.”

Write it down. Have a dream so big that it can’t be accomplished in your lifetime. Why? Because you’ll never wear out. You’ll never burn out. You’ll never give up. You’ll die climbing. You’ll die winning. And then he talked about people who think multi-generationally. Several years ago, in 2017 or 18, Julie and I went to Rome. We spent a week in and around Rome, and we got a tour of the Coliseum. And they’re talking about the Coliseum. And it took four generations or something like that to build the Roman Coliseum. And the original emperor who envisioned it and started construction on it, he knew that he would probably never live to see it completed. And it was not his son, not his grandson, but his great-grandson that actually finished the Roman Coliseum. That was the way ancient civilizations that built great empires, they fought that way. They had dreams so big that they could not be accomplished in their lifetime. And they built shit. They built shit that thousands of years later, people still go and look at it. How many things were built in America that were built to last for 2000 years?

Speaker 4:

Things in the early 1900s, 1800s.

Speaker 1:

Maybe some.

Speaker 4:

I meant those were when things were I think more beautiful.

Speaker 1:

And there was certainly more pride. Today, most of the construction is just like, “Get it up, make a big, sell it for the most money you can.” It’s just a different thought, right? We don’t think multi-generationally.

Speaker 4:

Mount Rushmore. That’s it.

Speaker 1:

Mount Rushmore. Okay. I don’t know.

Speaker 3:

I disagree.

Speaker 1:

Well, it don’t matter. It don’t matter. It’s just his opinion. But the point is it’s a different way of thinking the way most Americans think, right? We think, “What can I do this year? Well, how quick can I get this? I want my dream house. I want it next year.” Rather than to go, “I’m going to have that. How long’s going to take me to get it? Thirty years. Done.” Can I actually have a dream so big that takes you 30 years to achieve? But you look at the highest achievers, and that’s the way they live. It’s the way they play. And when they’ve achieved one massive dream, do they stop? Nope. They go to the next big dream.

But they have one thing in common. They’re all fucking big. And they’re almost always the next one’s bigger than the smaller. And Bill Gates, they interviewed him and said, “Do you have any regrets about Microsoft?” And he said, “Yeah, my biggest regret is my dream was too small. My vision was too small.” What had been his dream? And he still was a stated vision of Microsoft. We’ll have a personal computer in every living room in America in my lifetime. And he said, “I limited it. I limited my vision to America.” Here’s a guy that became the wealthiest man in the world who said, “My biggest problem was my dream was too small.”

 

 

 

 

 

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