A YesMasters Mantra & How You Achieve Big Dreams

 

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Summary

The Real Estate Vortex is the framework of a high 6 or 7-figure business. Like a swirling storm, it attracts business to its center. And at the core of the Real Estate Vortex is YOU. You are the eye of the storm (where it’s calm).

The YesMasters Mantra: “I am the eye of the storm. I remain calm & centered regardless of anything.”

How do you make more money & achieve big dreams?

First, you have to learn to dream bigger. The way you do that is through EXPOSURE.

Expose yourself to more expensive things, higher accomplishments, bigger achievers. This helps you realize that what you used to think impossible is actually possible.

But here’s the problem…

Subconsciously, we try to justify not having something nice because we can’t afford it. We create a story in our heads and tell ourselves that we don’t want it, in order to justify why we don’t have it.

If you want to make money, you have to dream bigger. Are you up for the challenge?

 

Full Transcript

What is this?

This is The Real Estate Vortex. Who is this?

You.

This is not me, this is you. Okay? This is you. You are the energy core of the vortex. Now a vortex is a giant swirling motion that draws everything into its center. Now, you guys have seen hurricanes, you’ve seen tornadoes. The outside, all of the vortex on the outside, there is massive motion, there is chaos, turmoil. But what is this? What’s in the center? It’s absolutely calm, right? When you go into the eye of the storm, there it is… calm.

So, here is the mantra that I want you just to think as you go into this. 

In fact, write this down in your journal. I think it’s brilliant. I am the eye.

I am the eye of the-

I am the eye…

Of the storm.

… of the storm.

Giddy up.

Write it down. I am the eye of the storm.

I remain calm and centered regardless of anything. I am the eye of the storm. I remain calm and centered regardless of anything. I am the eye of the storm. I remain calm and centered regardless of anything. Okay guys.

How do you achieve big dreams? 

How many of you feel like you need to learn how to dream bigger? That’s it. Do you feel it or not? Do you feel like you need to learn to dream bigger?

Oh, absolutely.

How do you create bigger dreams? The way you create bigger dreams is exposure. Got to expose yourself to nicer shit. Got to expose stuff. Expose yourself to bigger shit, to bigger achievers, to what’s possible, to higher accomplishments. Darlene, after you get my coffee made, would you bring me some Robb Reports?

Yes. I’ll bring them right now.

Thank you. So one is exposure, over and over and over again.

What’s that?

The rich people magazine, Robb Report.

Yeah. Isn’t that interesting. You call it the rich people magazine.

Uh-huh. Isn’t it?

I said you call it the rich people magazine.

I really want.

Just showing you the difference.

What’s that?

It isn’t just showing you expensive stuff. It’s listings of houses and stuff like that? The Robb Report.

Expensive stuff.

The Robb Report, I call it the toy store. It’s a toy catalog for people that have enough money that they don’t ask, “How much is it?” That’s what I call it.

One last question.

I have a question. So, I’m kind of like, does it never get to a point where you feel the things that you desire are unnecessary because I have to, in essence, have an attachment to the item in order to fill the need to keep it.

Of course.

Or like your table. If it were some material in it, that reminded me of something. You know what I’m saying? I like to feel tied to the things that I have. So, me just having a whole bunch of stuff that doesn’t really excite me. Sort of like experiences, yes. And then things that have-

Absolutely.

… sentimental value. But, other than that? So, I don’t know, exposure to get more experiences will work for me.

I don’t know. But here’s what I also know…

It’s your dream.

That a lot of our stories, because that’s your story. It doesn’t mean it’s a good story or bad story. That’s just my story. Your story is I don’t really want a lot of stuff unless it has some meaning to me.

Mm-hmm.

Okay? How much money is too much money to spend on a bed?

Well, there’s never enough.

There’s no such thing.

What’s that?

You can never spend too much money on a bed.

Yes.

What’s a bed?

And it is subjective.

I value my sleep. I can never sleep too much.

There’s some people who spend like are you talking about mattress or are you talking about…

Well, as part of a bed.

People spend like a hundred thousand dollars on that.

Yep.

My boyfriend’s an interior designer for celebrities and they spend $30,000, $50,000 on mattresses all the time.

And why do they do that?

Well, some want to have the best of the best or two, they actually feel that the higher quality gives them better sleep and sleep’s important to them. And that’s also a bunch of different stuff that could go into it.

You’re going to spend a third of your life-

 

And the way you spend that time matters to your recovery. Good sleep, good recovery. And we are learning this more and more all the time. Usain Bolt, who is Usain Bolt?

Sprinter.

Guy’s been through a lot.

He’s the fastest.

Yeah, he was. Is he still the world record holder of the hundred-meter dash?

I feel someone got close or does he still hold it?

No, he still holds it.

I used to hold the…

So, we’ll just say he’s the fastest man ever recorded to put on shoes. How’s that?

Mm-hmm.

So, here’s what he says about recovery. He says 80% of my training is recovery. 

So, what they’re discovering about high performers, high achievers, not just in the performing athletics but in anything is their ability to recover. Their ability to recover, and a good bed helps that process. They also talk about the quality of your sheets, the weight of your comforter or whatever. And then the other basics act the same as preference for some. And there’s just some things like optimal temperatures for sleeping. For getting good, deep, the right kind of sleep, the cooler it is, actually, your body recovers better.

My wife likes to sleep in a hot room. I hate it. And she’s in Korea right now. I’m like in heaven, man, because I make it so cold. I turn on the fan and she doesn’t like the fan and it’s like, I mean, obviously, we sleep together, but she sleeps with a comforter and I double it over her and I don’t like it. But I also like the weight of a comforter.

Right.

Mm-hmm.

I love the weight of a comforter. But to do that I got to have air movement and it needs to be cool. But that’s called a relationship, right?

Right.

Mm-hmm.

As you’re making adjustments and adapting and compromising and stuff like that.

When we bought the mattress we have right now, I don’t know how much we spent for it. It was over 10,000, but it was the best of the best beds. I don’t like memory foam. I think memory foam is very just, I don’t know. I’m uncomfortable with it. I don’t like the way I feel when I sleep on it. And anyway, but we bought it because it was the best of the best and we’re like, “Okay, I like it.” We spent hours in bed stores just because somebody told us, “You spend a third of your life in bed, eight hours a day, doesn’t it make sense to invest in something good” Like, “Okay.” And my mind was so resistant to paying that kind of money for a mattress until they changed my story and I’m like, “Hmm, maybe I don’t know everything.” Right? And then I start laying on these beds. Like, “Can you feel the difference?” I’m like, “Yeah, I can feel the difference.”

Now, how much of that is marketing? Marketing and gimmicks and how much is real? I think pretty much of that, there’s some legit to it. Is all of it legit? I don’t know. I don’t care. But I’m like, “I’m going to get the best. I want the best of the…” Now, I did not get the best of the best that you could buy anywhere in the world, but I got the best of the best of whatever Serta makes or whatever it is.

But be very careful about saying you don’t want something or like something when you can’t afford it. I learned this from a guy, his name was, what was his name? Bradley. Bradley something. Anyway, he was a Triple Diamond in Amway and that’s just my experience. So, I got to go to his house in Whitefish, Montana and this house was like insane, right? 8,000 square feet, elevators, and this is back, I mean, we’re talking back in 2005 or something like that. This guy has a refrigerator in every room and they’re the built-in wall refrigerators that you pull out the drawer and they’re just has water popping up. He has them in every room? He said, my dream is to have a house so big I need a golf cart just to get from one end of the house to the other. I’m like, “Okay.”

Well, it’s almost that big. And they use golf carts to get around from their house to the barn, to the animal barn. They had one barn that was a toy barn and the toy barn had all the ATVs in it, and the dune buggies, and the motorcycles, and the bicycles. And then one half of it was a half of a basketball gymnasium, indoor because this is in Whitefish, Montana, where it gets cold. And all of it’s totally, fully insulated all year round. And he had a collection of very expensive cars and one of them was a Porsche. It was probably a Porsche 911, I’m pretty sure it was a Porsche 911, and I know it was Porsche 911 because we were looking and we were touring the place. So, we’re all doing this touring. There’s about 30 or 40 of us there. And so we get in and he’s doing training that evening and he said, “So, I heard one of you guys thinks a Porsche 911’s ugly car.” And he’s like, “Who said that? Who said it?”

You did.

I would.

So, finally, one of the guys, he was like, “So, why do you think Porsche 911’s ugly?” “I just think they’re ugly. I think it looks like a bullfrog.” I mean, the headlights were, it looks like, he’s like, “I think it looks like a bullfrog.” Just context, I agree with him. I used to think that Porsche 911s were ugly cars. And he is like, “Let me ask you a question. Do you know how much a Porsche 911 costs?” And it was a six figure car back then. And he was like, “No.” He said, “A hundred and…” I don’t know how much you spent on that, but it was one of the really expensive ones. So, it may have been a couple hundred thousand. I don’t know what it was. He said, “Could you afford that right now?” The guy says, “Right now?” “Yeah, that’s what I said, right now, could you afford it right now?” “No.” “Then, why don’t you shut up?”

And he was doing it kind of funny because he’s funny, I’m not funny. I’m just intense. It was kind of funny when he did it and he said, “I used to think a Porsche 911 was the ugliest car on the planet.” He said, “But here’s the difference. It’s amazing how pretty something becomes when you can actually afford to buy it.” He said, “Now, once you can afford to buy a Porsche 911, if you want to look at a Porsche 911 and go like, ‘Nah, it’s an ugly piece of shit.’ That’s all right.” But he said, “What happens is, subconsciously, we try to justify not having something nice because we can’t afford it. So, we create a story to justify why we don’t have it is that we don’t want it.”

“The reason I don’t have a Porsche 911, I would never want to buy a Porsche.” “I’d never want one of those big 7,000 square foot houses. Are you kidding? What does anybody need a 7,000 square foot house for?” “Have you ever lived in a 7,000 square foot house? No, and then shut the fuck up. You don’t know what you’re talking about because it’s amazing how nice living a 7,500 square foot house is when you don’t have to worry about the price.” Indoor heated pool, indoor bowling alley, whatever. So, can I give you guys some principles for making money?

Yes.

Please do.

Dream bigger.

 

 

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